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The country’s Official Gazette published the decrees Saturday evening.

The first named thousands of civil servants to be dismissed, including nearly 500 academics and more than 1,000 Turkish military personnel. The second decree, among other things, banned radio and television programs for “finding friends and spouses” by adding a clause to the article on protecting children in Turkey’s media law.

Those in jail or out of a job include academics, public transport employees, teachers and at least 120 journalists — more than in any other country in the world.

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Since the July coup attempt, almost 47,000 people have been arrested, with the country under emergency rule as well.

The referendum also exposed bitter divisions in the country, with opposition groups decrying the vote as illegitimate.

Two weeks after winning the Turkish constitutional referendum by a modest but decisive margin, president - or perhaps it is now despot - Erdogan decided to take his newly decreed powers for a spin and overnight in rapid succession surprised foreign observers when Turkey decreed that it would ban TV dating shows, fire an additional 4,000 public officials and also ban Wikipedia.

The country's Official Gazette published the decrees on Saturday evening.

On the dating show ban, the decree stated, “In radio and television broadcasting services, such programs in which people are introduced to find a friend …

cannot be permitted.” Deputy Prime Minister Numan Kurtulmus had alluded to the ban in March, arguing the shows do not fit in with Turkish traditions and customs.The second decree, among other things, bans radio and television programs for "finding friends and spouses" according to AP.The latest purge follows more than 47,000 people have been arrested and 100,000 have been terminated for alleged connections to terror organizations, and takes place with Turkey under a state of emergency resulting from last summer's failed "coup" attempt which Erdogan blamed on the "shadow state" directed by the cleric Fethullah Gulen, who currently resides in rural Pennsylvania.The first named thousands of civil servants to be dismissed, including nearly 500 academics and more than 1,000 Turkish military personnel.The decree also reinstated 236 people to their jobs.The dismissals mean that an estimated 140,000 people have now been purged from the state and private sectors, and more than 1,500 civil groups closed, since a failed coup last year. Since the referendum, and before Saturday’s move, the police had detained more than 1,000 workers and suspended a further 9,000 accused of having ties to an Islamic group founded by a United States-based cleric, Fethullah Gulen. Erdogan, but is now accused by the government of masterminding the failed attempt to overthrow him in July. If he brings him home and executes him, he can’t keep using him as a boogieman.